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Critical Comparative Book Review

Copy of assignment
Example of a completed checklist
Sample paper #1
Sample paper #2
Example of a book citation in MLA format
Sample paper in MLA format

History Checklists


USE CATALOGS TO FIND BOOKS.

Books are a great source for background reading or historical information. Due to their length topics are be explored in depth. When searching for a biography, search for the person as a "subject." This will eliminate books written by the person, and only retrieve books about the person. The title of the book may or may not have the word "biography" in it, and it may be necessary to actually see the book before you can ascertain that it is appropriate for your needs. Major historical figures will have many more books written about them, than lesser, or more contemporary figures.

Capital Community College Library Catalog.

Once you have located a book in the catalog you need to locate it in the library book stacks. The books are arranged in alphabetical order according to their call numbers. A brief summary of the classification system may be found here.

If you are unable to find a suitable book located in the Capital Community College Library, search the other libraries in the area. All of the URLs may be linked to from the College Library Website.

Library Connection Catalog.

Hartford Public Library Catalog.

Other Library Catalogs.

reQuest (regional libraries).


ILL REQUESTS
To request a book from another library fill out an interlibrary loan form, either online, or in person at the circulation desk.

Although we process the interlibrary loan request on the day we receive it, it may take one to two weeks to actually receive the book. If you would like the book immediately, you may use your public library card at any public library in Connecticut. You may use your Capital Community College library card at any community college in Connecticut. If you locate a book at another college, outside the community college system, you must have our interlibrary loan department make the request.


FIND BACKGROUND INFORMATION.

A Reference Source is a book or database which gives brief information or an introduction to a topic. There are many types of reference sources, including encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, directories, and sources for statistics. Many of these sources may be found online. Often suggestions for additional reading follow the article.
(Access from home via mycommnet).

U.S. History in Context
World History in Context
Encyclopedia Britannica
American National Biography
Biography in Context

FIND BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE AUTHOR.

Google
New York Times Historical 1851-2007
New York Times 2007 to present
Hartford Courant Historical 1764-1922
Literary Reference Center
American National Biography
Biography in Context

ADDITIONALLY AN EXTENSIVE LIST OF HISTORY WEBSITES IS LOCATED HERE.


CAPITAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE REFERENCE BOOKS Sample page/Chronology of World History


A WORD ABOUT PLAGIARISM

A Statement on Plagiarism Using someone else's ideas or phrasing and representing those ideas or your own, either on purpose or through carelessness, is a serious offense known as plagiarism. "Ideas or phrasing" includes written or spoken material, of course -- from whole papers and paragraphs to sentences, and, indeed, phrases -- but it also includes statistics, lab results, art work, etc. "Someone else" can mean a professional source, such as a published writer or critic in a book, magazine, encyclopedia, journal or in an electronic resource such as material you discover on the World Wide Web; another student at your school or anywhere else; a paper-writing "service" which offers to sell written papers for a fee.

Penalty for Plagiarism The penalty for plagiarism is usually determined by the instructor teaching the course involved; in many schools and colleges, it could involve failure for the paper and it could mean failure for the entire course and even expulsion from school. At the very least, however, students who plagiarize have cheated themselves out of the experience of being responsible members of the academic community and have cheated their classmates by pretending to contribute something original which is, in fact, a cheap copy.


CITE WHAT YOU FIND USING A STANDARD FORMAT

After you formulate your research question, examine various sources of information, and write your paper, the final product should be uniquely yours. If you decide to use the exact words of an author you have to give that person credit. If you do not give the author appropriate credit you are guilty of plagiarism. Webster's Dictionary defines plagiarism as stealing and passing off the ideas and words of another as one's own. "Ideas or words" can include written or spoken material, statistics, lab results, art work, etc. If you have quoted a published writer or critic in a book, magazine, encyclopedia, or journal; another student at this college or elsewhere; or various Internet sites, you must give appropriate credit in your paper.

The penalty for plagiarism is determined by the professor teaching the course; more often than not, however, it will involve failure for the paper and it could mean failure for the entire course. Repeated infractions of this essential principle of academic responsibility could result in expulsion from the college. Penalties published in Capital's Student Handbook are subject to guidelines determined by the Board of Trustees of Connecticut Community Colleges.

For automated help in formatting citations refer to CITATION MACHINE. The results although accurate, are not guaranteed in every instance. It is wise to doublecheck with the printed guide.