Sentence Sense home   part one index parts 2 part 4 part 4
blank   chapter #    

chapter 5.7 Embedded Thoughts: Combining Sentences by Compounding Embedded Thoughts

Several embedded thoughts may be compounded in a single sentence.
Judy thought {that the professor would have left} but {that the students would still be in the room}.
Since subjects, completers, and modifiers can be compounded, embedded thoughts that play these sentence roles can also be compounded by the conjunctions and, but, yet, or, nor. Remember that when two or more sentence parts of the same type are compounded, the conjunction usually appears between only the last two, and the others are separated by commas.

Separate sentences with embedded subjects:

{Popping huge gum bubbles} was Judy's specialty.
{Making dramatic entrances} to class was her specialty, too.
Separate sentences with embedded modifiers:
Today she popped one bubble too many and found herself face to face
with a {gum-spattered} Professor Scianna.
This was an {astonished} person.
This was an {infuriated} person.
{Not blushing a bit}, Judy shook his hand with great dignity.
{Not cracking a smile}, Judy did this.
Combinations:
{Popping huge gum bubbles} and {making dramatic entrances in class} were Judy's specialties.

Today she popped one bubble too many and found herself face to face with a {gum-spattered}, {astonished}, and {infuriated} Professor Scianna.

{Neither blushing a bit} nor {cracking a smile}, Judy shook his hand with great dignity.


pencil Application 12

home chapter 3        



 
Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7