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1.2 Overview: Growing Sentences

Sentences grow.

These sentences grow.
Sentences on this page grow.
Starting from seeds, sentences grow.
Sentences that sprout modifiers grow.

 

 

Sentences grow easily.
Sentences grow before your eyes.
Sentences grow to develop sturdy shapes.
Sentences grow until they seem to gather
a momentum of their own.

Sentences grow branches.
Sentences grow new branches.
Sentences grow branches of words.
Sentences grow branches unfolding fresh ideas.
Sentences grow branches that may blossom with unexpected possibilities.

Starting from seeds, these sentences that sprout
modifiers grow easily before your eyes until they
seem to gather a momentum of their own. To
develop sturdy shapes, sentences grow new
branches of words, unfolding fresh ideas that
may blossom with unexpected possibilities.


In the sentences below, look at the words in this color. What do all these words have in common? Now look at the words in this color. What do these words have in common with each other?
  • Sentences grow.
  • Love deceives.
  • Someone is painting.
  • Kenisha must have forgotten.
  • Were they hiding?
The seed of a sentence is made of a subject and a verb. Chapter 2 focuses on verbs and Chapter 3 focuses on subjects.

In the sentences below, look at the underlined words. What do these words have in common?

  • Sentences grow branches.
  • Love deceives people.
  • Someone is painting grafitti.
  • Kenisha must have forgotten Donnell.
  • Were they doing anything?
Sometimes a third part may join the subject/verb seed to complete the sentence's idea. The underlined words above are completers. Chapter 4 examines what completers do.

In the sentences below, notice how the subjects, verbs, or completers grow in meaning when descriptive words or groups of words are added.

  • These sentences grow branches.
  • Love sometimes deceives people.
  • Someone is painting fresh graffiti.
  • Kenisha must have forgotten Donnell [since the summer].
  • Were they hiding anything [of value]?
These new words, in italics, or [italics within brackets] when a phrase is involved, are modifiers. Some modifiers are single words, but others are groups of words. Chapter 4 shows how modifiers work. But before you get there, experiment with the four sentence parts for a few minutes here. The following application will help you to see what you already know about subjects, verbs, completers, and modifiers.

pencilApplication

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