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6.11 Capitalization and Punctuation: Review & Practice

Review & Practice
Instructions


This exercise is an opportunity for you to test your understanding of the material covered in Chapter 6: Capitization and Punctuation.

A capital letter signals the start of a new sentence. A period, question mark, or exclamation point signals the end of the sentence.

Click each "sentence" button and a sentence with capitalization and punctuation problems will appear. Fix the errors before comparing your work to the computer's response by clicking the "answer" button.

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Commas signal the breaks between three or more units in a series. When two or more independent clauses are compounded, a comma comes before the conjunction.

Click on the "sentence" button and a sentence with comma problems will appear. Insert the necessary comma(s) before comparing your work to the computer's response.

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When a modifying phrase or clause comes before the independent clause in a sentence, a comma marks the end of the introductory phrase or clause. When an interruption enters a sentence, a comma or commas set it off from the rest of the sentence.

Insert a comma or commas where they are necessary in the following sentences. Compare your work to the computer's responses.

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When a quotation is included in a sentence, a comma separates the quoted words from the rest of the sentence. In a date or an address, the items are separated by commas.

Insert commas where appropriate in the following sentences.

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A colon introduces a list or an explanation. A semicolon joins independent clauses or separates items in a complex series.

Insert colons or semicolons where they would be appropriate in the following sentences.

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Quotation marks enclose the exact words of a speaker or the title of a story, poem, or short work. Parentheses enclose nonessential information.

Insert quotation marks or parentheses where they would be appropriate in the following sentences. Also, don't leave out any appropriate puntuation marks that fall within the quotation marks or parentheses.

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